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Brown Spots
 
Brown Spots

Brown spots on the skin (non-moles) can represent a number of different entities. Most commonly they are diagnosed as melasma, lentigines, or seborrheic keratoses. During a skin examination, Dr. Davis can determine what your brown spots are and offer you a variety of treatment options.

Before and AfterMelasma
Melasma is facial discoloration with broad patches of darker (tan or brown) colored skin. It occurs most often on the cheeks, upper lip, and forehead. Melasma is much more common in woman (but can occur in men) and in people with darker skin colors; such as Asian, Black, Hispanic, or Middle Eastern individuals. Strong sun exposure is considered a leading cause of melasma. Several other factors are also believed to be possible contributors to melasma, including pregnancy, birth control pills, hormone therapy, genetics, and skin color.

Dr. Davis can treat melasma by:

  • Recommending topical bleaching therapy. The most common are topical creams with hydroquinone, and these can either be over-the-counter (weaker) or prescribed (stronger). For about 8 weeks, bleaching creams should be applied at night with strong sun block worn during the day. Sun block should be continuously worn even after the 8 weeks.
  • Performing laser therapy (see photodynamic laser therapy for sun damage page).
  • Performing Dermasweep treatments. One of the infusions for Dermasweep treats hyperpigmentation (discoloration), and it can decrease the appearance of melasma. See Dermasweep page for more information.

Before and AfterLentigines
Lentigines (a.k.a. “liver” spots although they are not related to liver function) are flat brown freckles which form as a result of sun damage, usually evolving over many years.

Dr. Davis can treat lentigines by:

  • Freezing them with liquid nitrogen. The lesions will crumble and peel off to reveal new skin.
  • Applying the liquid acid phenol. The lesions will crumble and peel off to reveal new skin.
  • Performing electrosurgery if the lesions are tiny. The lentigines are burned, and a scab forms and peels off to reveal new skin underneath.

If needed, Dr. Davis can treat many spots all at once during the course of one office visit.

Before and AfterSeborrheic keratoses
Seborrheic keratoses present as raised, rough brown skin growths that can look like warts or moles. They are non-cancerous and have a waxy, “stuck-on” appearance. Seborrheic keratoses can appear on both sun-exposed and non sun-exposed areas, and become more common as you age.

Dr. Davis can treat seborrheic keratoses by:

  • Freezing them with liquid nitrogen. The lesions will darken, crumble, and peel! off to reveal new skin underneath.
  • Removing them by burning or shaving them off. A local anesthetic is used to eliminate discomfort.
  • Applying ethyl chloride spray. This stiffens the lesions so that they can be scraped off with a curette.

If needed, Dr. Davis can treat many spots all at once during the course of one office visit.

 
 
 

69 Fifth Ave at 14th Street, New York, NY 10003
Tel. 212-242-3066 themanhattandermatologist@gmail.com

www.themanhattandermatologist.com